Against the odds, Care of the elderly, Change management, Community, Compassion, Courage, Discharge from hospital, Helping others, Hospital, Human kindness, Human rights, Kindness, Learning, Media, NHS, NHS Systems and processes, Patient care, Psychology, Respect, Surgery, Women's health, Women's rights

 The role of L❤️VE in healthcare 

I recently rewatched    THIS FILM   of Dr Donald Berwick giving the keynote speech in London 2013 to The International Forum on Quality and Safety in Healthcare. This presentation struck a chord with me . 

In the NHS there are many systems and processes which promote working within the confines of guidance and staffing  . However, time and time again there seems to be omissions about how guidance can encompass love . When people love their job and they feel valued within their particular role the result is better health care . It can’t be a coincidence that this is because if you love your job then in effect you love the people you care for .  

When we talk about “love” it’s sometimes misunderstood – actually being human is about loving others .

 I was once in an orthopaedic ward as a patient following an accident and had to have major surgery on my lower leg – a pin and plate and internal fixation , tendon repairs . This operation left me non-weight bearing for 12 weeks . My mobility was severely compromised . In the bed next to me was an elderly woman let’s call her “Sophie”. Each day I’d watch some staff forget to put Sophie’s drink within her reach and this troubled me greatly . I’d ask staff to move her drink closer and I was usually given ‘the look’ i.e “what business is it of yours?” In fact it was totally my business as a human to care about another human . So I made a decision that I’d make Sophie’s hydration my job and also the job of my visitors . Sophie had no visitors , she was confused and didn’t really talk much . I asked my family to bring her a few bottles of sugar free cordial and set about my mission . On a daily basis I hopped to her bed and made her several drinks over the course of the day – usually out of sight of the staff . I began to recognise when she wanted the toilet as she’d shout out , then I’d alert the staff . This went on over about 6 days and with my visitors helping Sophie was soon rehydrated and talking – in fact she was well enough to go back to the nursing home she had been admitted from . 

So what made me do this ? I didn’t know Sophie and I could’ve just focused on my own recovery. In fact Sophie helped me to find the courage to use my crutches (something I was petrified of using) and she took my mind off my own pain and frustration . Much more than this however I saw myself as Sophie in years to come – ‘sat out’ in a chair unable to move or communicate , hoping for the staff to be kind , for the kindness of strangers to aid my recovery or to ease my loneliness in some way . 

“We are all one another” 

I never told anyone about this before except my family who were also directly responsible for Sophie’s recovery . You see the truth is we didn’t do it for recognition – we de it because we are human 

Thank you for reading 

With love , Jenny ❤️

Against the odds, Care of the elderly, Community, Compassion, Courage, Fables, Helping others, Hospital, Human kindness, Human rights, Kindness, Learning, MatExp, Midwife, Midwifery, New parents, Newborn, Newborn attachment, NHS Systems and processes, Patient care, Psychology, Respect, Teaching, Women's health, Working from the heart

The fable of the napkin folder 

There was once a factory in a far away land . The factory owner Fred  took immense pride in his factory .

This was no normal place to work , the employees had to fold napkins at the same time as caring for an elderly person . This care involved mainly talking to the elderly person and making the person happy through conversation – this was an intrinsic  part of their work – but I’d like you remember that  the employee also had to fold napkins .

Suki was an employee at the factory , she was an amazing napkin folder and the top napkin folder at the factory . The factory owner raved on and on about how good Suki was at her job – he promoted her and used her as a role model of efficiency whenever he went to other napkin folding factories . Suki felt very proud and kept working hard .

One day Suki’s chair broke – so she had to move to another area whilst it was fixed . Suki sat next to Giles who was also a napkin folder – Giles wasn’t very productive but he did attain adequate levels of napkin folding  to keep himself in employment . Suki noticed amazing things about Giles he was working but also chatting away to his allocated elderly person quite a lot , the elderly person was called Gertrude . Suki noticed that Gertrude looked very happy and Suki suddenly realised that all the years at the napkin folding factory her own allocated elderly person had never laughed like Gertrude . 

The next day Suki went to see Fred the factory manager and told him about Giles & Gertrude . “I think we should watch Giles” Suki said . Fred the factory owner went to see Giles and immediately noticed how joyful he was in his work – Suki was happy but Giles had that extra ‘je ne sais quoi’ . The factory owner also checked all the records of all the elderly people that Giles had sat with whilst he folded napkins . A wonderful thing had come to light not only had no one complained but there were letters of thanks from families of the elderly people stating how kind Giles had been and recommendations for his promotion .

The next day Fred the factory owner made an announcement to all the people at the factory  

“All of us within this factory should give a higher priority to making each elderly person happy  over and above folding napkins. In this wonderful life  we are simply spreading kindness , compassion and the human spirit . Look at Giles and Getrude and the happiness they emit and share . ”

Over the next few months the factory workers tried their best each day to give their priority to each of their allocated elderly people. A remarkable thing started to happen – productivity increased and surprise,y more napkins were folded than ever before  but also the workers felt more valued  and much happier about being at work – plus much more than that the physical and mental health of the elderly people involved took a significant improvement – because in the end we are on earth to be human .

I hope you enjoy my fable . 
Thank you for reading 
❤️Jenny❤️

Babies, Being busy as a midwife, Birth, Breastfeeding, Caesarean section, Care of the elderly, Change management, Children, Community care, Compassion, Courage, Helping others, Hospital, Human rights, Kindness, Labour and birth, Learning, Media, Midwife, Midwifery, Midwifery and birth, New parents, Newborn, Newborn attachment, NHS, NHS Systems and processes, Nursing, Obstetrics, Patient care, Respect, Surgery, Teaching, Women's health, Young mothers, Young women

#LeadToAdd 

LeadToAdd click HERE to learn more is the latest NHS England campaign # is #LeadToAdd. As a Caremaker I will be linking this on Twitter with my work on #skinToskin , #futuremidwives and #couragebutter to inspire others to see themselves as leaders regardless of their role . Patients, women, families and non-clinical staff are also leaders .  
I feel this will inspire/activate different meanings to different people

Here are some of my thoughts around it

What does to lead mean ? 
To take charge , to be at the front , to inspire , to educate, to be diverse 
Leading is about being at the front and CONSTANTLY looking back to bring others with you

Leading is about being the first to begin something but not necessarily holding onto that but looking at how your actions impact on the way others fulfil their role. Leading is being a positive role model, leading is about looking inwards at your own behaviour and also looking outwards at the behaviour of others . 

In the NHS all staff need encouragement to recognise themselves as leaders and also to see that some behaviours do not embody leadership. We are all learning each day, so don’t stay still – question yourself and the way you speak to others . Ask a colleague to listen to you talking to patients and staff and to give you feedback -what could you change ? Integrate telephone conversations into drills training-  talk to your practice development team – think outside the box . 

Someone who leads others into poor practice is a poor leader but a leader non the less so be aware of your own commitment to pass the positive leadership baton . We are human and it’s ok to make mistakes , however we must learn, evolve and change .

The other day I had a car journey with Joan Pons Laplana (@ThebestJoan on twitter) and once again he made me think hard about how the 6Cs are integrated into practice . Joan said to me that as a health care professional all tasks and procedures must embody the 6Cs – even answering a telephone call. 
As a form of reflection I’d like you to read passage one and then passage two
Passage One 
Busy labour ward – phone ringing , midwife answered the phone – we will call the person making the call Tony and his partner who is having a baby is called Dolores. The midwives name will be Darcy . 
Midwife ( confident and cheery) ” hello labour ward , midwife speaking how can I help you?”
Tony (nervous voice) ” oh hi – err my partner thinks she’s in labour , it’s our first baby and we are a bit nervous . Could I ask you some questions , she’s here but having a contraction right now and then she feels sick for a few minutes after its gone. 
Midwife “oh right well I need to talk to her please and decide what’s happening’  
I’m not going to continue this but could the midwife change her approach ? Is this midwife you ? A colleague? This approach has been learnt from a peer
Passage Two 

Busy labour ward – phone ringing , midwife answered the phone – we will call the person making the call Tony and his partner who is having a baby is called Dolores. The midwives name will be Darcy . ….

Midwife ( confident and cheery) ” hello labour ward , my name is Darcy Jones I’m a midwife and how can I help you?”
Tony (nervous voice) ” oh hi Darcy – I’m Tony – err my partner Dolores thinks she’s in labour , it’s our first baby and we are a bit nervous . Could I ask you some questions , she’s here but having a contraction right now and then she feels sick for a few minutes after its gone. 
Midwife “ok well I would like to take some details first whilst Dolores has a contraction . Thank you so much for ringing us . How are you feeling ? This is your first baby ? How exciting for you both!” 
I’m not going to continue this but could the midwife change her approach In either scenario – which is the best one in your opinion ?  ? Is either of these scenarios you ? A colleague? This approach has been learnt from a peer. 
So you see two examples each one leaving the person contacting  the service with different emotions . 
Start your journey as a #LeadToAdd leader today  ❤️
Thank you for reading 
Love , Jenny ❤️

Antenatal education, Babies, Being busy as a midwife, Birth, Breastfeeding, Caesarean section, Change management, Children, Compassion, Courage, Helping others, Hospital, Human rights, Intra-operative care, Kindness, Labour and birth, Learning, Manual removal of the placenta, MatExp, Media, Midwife, Midwifery, Midwifery and birth, New parents, Newborn, Newborn attachment, NHS, NHS Systems and processes, Obstetrics, Patient care, Post traumatic stress disorder, Postnatal care, Respect, Skin to skin contact, Surgery, Teaching, Women's health, Women's rights, Young mothers, Young women

The natural caesarean / the gentle caesarean 

There’s a debate on Twitter this morning about the ‘natural caesarean’ as a term that promotes a positive experience of birth by caesarean. I don’t agree with the term and I think as health care professionals working in the area of birth we should ensure that every birth is a positive birth . Milli Hill started the The Positive Birth Movement  with this goal in mind (@birthpositive on Twitter ) 

Bearing this in mind I’d like to ask the following questions for you to consider and share with with your colleagues, family , friends , midwives and obstetricians . 
1. How many women who have an emergency caeserean and/or instrumental birth (forceps or ventouse) are given information in the antenatal period about the far reaching health and psychological benefits of skin to skin contact in this setting to both mother and baby ? 

2. Compare the above with how many women are given information about  skin to skin contact around normal birth ? 

3. Compare both to how many woman are informed that skin to skin is possible during manual removal of placenta and repair of any perineal trauma in the theatre setting ? 

4. Are women informed 

  • They can TELL midwives to defer the weighing of their newborn in order to enjoy the benefits of prolonged skin to skin contact 
  • That they should never be separated from their baby unless a clinical situation becomes apparent or they themselves choose not to have skin to skin contact despite being FULLY informed
  • That their baby could ‘self latch’ at the breast without any handling by staff and also correct its own acidosis and stabilise its own breathing because of skin to skin contact ? 
  • That skin to skin and early breastfeeding “Pronurturance ” is linked to a reduction in the incidence of  postpartum haemorrhage?  CLICK RIGHT HERE for the Pronurturance paper 
  • That if babies could talk they would choose skin to skin contact despite their birth environment 
  • That skin to skin contact is the building block for a persons social and psychological development 

The midwives and staff on social media who talk about caesarean are not promoters of it , they are giving women information about choice – so that if the operation (which is major surgery) does take place then these women are able to not only enjoy their birth experience but give their relationship with their baby the best possible start . 

I suppose it’s similar to the question “does having a teenage pregnancy strategy increase teenage pregnancy rates ?  (and I much prefer the term  “young women”to ‘teenage pregnancy’) 

Does having full information about your choices if you do go on to have a caeserean increase caesarean rates ? I don’t know the answer to either of these questions but I do know that the women I have assisted and sometimes fought for to have skin to skin contact with their newborns in different birth situations have all told me this 

 
-that they never realised the positive impact it had on them as a successful mother

To me this is enough .   
Thank you for reading 

With love , Jenny ❤️

I am also promoting #MatExp as a platform which enables and encourages discussion between women, families and health care professionals . 

Antenatal education, Babies, Birth, Breastfeeding, Caesarean section, Change management, Children, Compassion, Courage, Discharge from hospital, Helping others, Hospital, Human rights, Intra-operative care, Kindness, Labour and birth, Learning, MatExp, Midwife, Midwifery, Midwifery and birth, New parents, Newborn, Newborn attachment, NHS Systems and processes, Obstetrics, Patient care, Postnatal care, Respect, Skin to skin contact, Surgery, Teaching, Women's rights, Young mothers

The Gentle Caesarean – Gentle with what ?

Last year I was lucky enough to work in a general theatre for a week . I met a wonderful general surgeon and watched him perform bowel surgery . I noticed immediately how gentle and kind he was with the internal tissues and how calm and respectful he was not only towards the patient and his body , but also the staff in the operating theatre. All the staff admired this surgeon – you know when you can just tell ?  

I asked the surgeon afterwards about his technique and he said this

 “I always respect the tissue Jenny- tissues , blood vessels  , muscle and skin are part  of our human make up and being gentle with them means I am showing tissue respect and respect to the patient who is a fellow human . Being a gentle surgeon takes longer but believe me the outcomes are better and I know that there is less trauma , post-op bleeding , infection, pain and therefore happier patients and staff .”

Currently there is a lot in the news and emerging research around “The Gentle caesarean” and I am looking at this from a different angle  (and for those who know me well I don’t do acceptance well – I like to ask things so that others unable to ask might think differently ) so I am questioning what this term “Gentle Caesarean” actually means . Does Gentle Caesarean mean just the moment of birth or should it be right from the decision or choice of the woman to have an operative birth through to arriving home ? 

So for all those who work in the field of midwifery , obstetrics , intra-operative care, surgery , pain management -I would like you to watch a caesarean from start to finish and ask yourself “was that a gentle caesarean from that the moment that the woman arrived in theatre ? Was there gentleness with the woman’s feelings and choices ? Did the obstetrician, scrub midwife and others maintain gentleness towards the internal tissues and the to the baby? Was the transfer to the bed from the operating theatre table gentle ? Was privacy and dignity maintained at all times? 

Just because we have always done something a certain way does not mean that “the way” is always the best . 

I hope I spark someone to change practice and make “The gentle caesarean” standard across the NHS because then it will spread  globally – we must question on a  daily basis what we do and why we do it .
Thank you for reading , please leave feedback and / or share this blog with your colleagues 
With love and midwifery kindness , 

❤️Jenny❤️
Addendum today I am thrilled that The Times journalist Katie Gibbons has written an article about skin to skin contact at Caesarean  CLICK HERE to access or being the rebel that I am here’s a photo 😁

 

Bereavement, Courage, Grieving, Human rights, Kindness, Learning, Media, NHS, Post traumatic stress disorder, Respect, Women's rights

Aiming and succeeding – the journey of others  

Today I’ve been reading a lot on the Internet and twitter about “The Secret” which is a dramatisation of real events that took place in Northern Ireland in 1991  -a tragedy that totally disrupted and still continues to affect the families of the victims . 

The courageous daughter of Lesley Howell (Lauren Bradford) tried her best to stop a programme going ahead . This programme has been advertised and aired on ITV as a “drama”. The drama is based on a tragic event that tore through the hearts of the families involved as well as their respective families and their friends . Lauren decided to make her own voice as well as others heard and wrote an outstanding, impactful letter to The Guardian about why she disagreed with the “drama” and the unforeseen effect of it being on aired on TV  would cause . The letter is  HERE

I feel that Lauren has written this letter to ROAR for her own mother  Lesley , a wonderful, strong, kind   and giving mother. Lesley’s voice was silenced by murder and so she cannot speak for herself about her life or how much her treasured children meant to her . Much more than this however Lauren has given other victims the chance to see that they too CAN  and MUST  speak out   – so in writing her wonderful letter she will have helped others to realise that their voices WILL  be heard . The media must no longer hold the power of ‘story telling the lives of others’  in order to make money or gain viewers or readers, they must realise that they don’t know the story so therefore it will never belong to them -it’s not their story after all is it?

Speaking out as a victim must be very difficult – which newspaper does a victim approach ?  Which TV company ? How does a victim ensure that their views enable others to empathise with their true story? Here’s how – be like Lauren   – write with truth and dignity in your heart. 

I am so immensely proud of Lauren  because through her words and thoughts she is actually helping others who may not be able to speak out to also have their voices heard . In addition to this Lauren is encouraging us all to think differently about how cases are reported and written about . How can it be right that a person can actually make money from someone else’s tragedy ? 

Thank you for reading and please leave your thoughts and comments on Lauren’s article . This will to help the media see there are two sides to every story .
❤️Jenny❤️

Babies, Birth, Care of the elderly, Community, Courage, Discharge from hospital, Discharge planning, Human rights, Kindness, Learning, Newborn, NHS, NHS Systems and processes, Nursing, Patient care, Skin to skin contact, Teaching

Processes within the NHS 

There is a phrase “going around” that takes the impact of what it’s like to be an elderly person without support and this derogatory term totally dehumanises a very human situation. Talking about humans as processes instead of shouting out loud that caring does not start and begin in a hospital is like saying that once a person reaches 70 nobody really cares about them. The roots of care, compassion and indeed humanity itself  are intertwined into community , family life and neighbourhoods. Love and care begin at birth when the impact of instinctual kindness and love from one’s own mother is portrayed immediately at the moment of arrival by her display of emotions, indescribable craving and total need to hold her newborn child. It is my quest that every midwife, obstetrician and in fact anyone who is privileged to be there when a child is born knows this and thinks about it every second before birth occurs and is instrumental I helping to facilitate it or shout out when it doesn’t seem to be . 

NOW I’d like you to imagine that you are a senior NHS manager questioning your clinical leaders about how to address the problem of  “bed blockers” you are driven and you don’t tolerate excuses . Suddenly fast forward your own life – you are 79 years old and living alone . Your family live just far enough away from you to prevent a daily visit . You are isolated and feel depressed so gradually without any realisation of it , you stop looking after yourself . Your home becomes as uncared for as you are and then you fall . The reason for your fall is that you didn’t like the new slippers your granddaughter bought you for Christmas they were too much like shoes. You therefore continue to wear your old worn ones and on this particular day as you descend your steep unsafe-for-a-79-year-old stairs, your slippers “tread free” soles slip on the edge of a stair – suddenly you’re in flight mode. Your hip dislocates and your femur breaks – time to realise after your operation and recovery in a rehabilitation centre that you can’t get home. Mainly due to the fact that your family are away for a few days in France and social services have deemed your house as unfit for you to move back into . One particular day you are “sat out” in a chair behind some curtains and you overhear a Dr and an occupational therapist talking – your name is used and that familiar term “bed blocker” Is mentioned. The words ring in your ears from when you used to say them about others and now you are one. 

Did you know  when ambulance crews take patients to accident and emergency that they have to wait and cannot leave their charge until the care is taken over by the hospital team. I know this because last year  I worked with an ambulance team for a day . We were transferring a woman to another hospital & I was the escort midwife – once in another zone the ambulance was recognised on the radar and unable to leave each time a 999 call was made . It was like being in another galaxy unable to return to our own a sort of NHS antithesis to Brigadoon. So if SEVEN ambulance crews arrive at a particular Accident and Emergency department all waiting to handover the care of their patients -SEVEN ambulances are simultaneously  off the road-what’s to be done about this?

A few months ago I realised I was digressing from my ” #skinToSkin” work and asked a friend what I should do . Political issues were starting to interest me more , I felt more aware of care for people living with dementia . I had started reading about how mental  health issues are addressed and pigeon holed. Nick Chinn taught me about silos and I realised that the NHS works in silos. My friends reply was “keep going Jenny – as a NHS Midwife you have a duty to be political so that you can tell others about the day you spent with the ambulance  crew, why skin to skin matters to society and is a public health issue . To be frank I’d be more worried if you said you felt apolitical” 

So my friends let’s keep going and let’s keep championing good care , outing systems that don’t put the patient and/or family at the heart of what we do – one day that “bed blocker” might just be you . 

Thank you for reading please feel free to leave comments – your input helps me to reflect and develop as a midwife , mother and human . 

❤️Jenny ❤️

Antenatal education, Babies, Birth, Breastfeeding, Kindness, Labour and birth, Learning, Midwifery and birth, New parents, Newborn, NHS, Postnatal care, Skin to skin contact, Teaching, Young mothers, Young women

A little book of labour and L❤️ve  

A while ago one of my dearest friends appeared at the front door of my home .When I say dear friend, she’s the kind of friend that you might not see for a few weeks or months yet when you do see her it’s just as if you saw each other yesterday- as if no time has passed since you last saw one another .You know what I mean – you both remain the same age as when you first met and restart  a conversation exactly where you left off . You know the kind of friend I’m talking about – one that will drop anything  anytime when he/she  hears those words “I need you”. That is exactly what she did for me and continues to do for me so many times I’ve lost count . She shows no judgment , never tells me what I “need to do” , doesn’t gossip and listens to me with true friendship and love in her heart for me , which is equally as strong as the love I have for her . 

Anyway back to the door – my friend was standing there and before she spoke I knew something was wrong , very wrong . I could tell in the wildness of her hair ,  the look in her eyes , the way she was standing and her sense of upset . I pulled her inside my home and hugged her . The news was that her 15 year old daughter “Verity” was pregnant .

We talked and I recalled a celebrity that once said ( I’m sorry but I’ve forgotten who it was) ….

” it might not be the right time or the right situation , but it will always be the right baby” 

I said those words to my friend , I listened , I didn’t tell her what to do I just gave her the love back that she’s always given me . 

The months went by and her daughter “Verity” (name changed for reasons of privacy)  was blooming , looking beautiful everything was going well . I sensed however that she was worried about labour and I decided to make her my “Little book for labour ”  I felt I had to do something to help her prepare in order to realise her own strength and to believe in her capability to give birth . I started the book I didn’t want to make it boring or prescriptive but fun and positive . I also realised the importance of going through the book , discussing induction of labour , vaginal examinations , acting on complications, early labour, food, and breastfeeding but most of all key support people and after the birth . 

So to sum up the book was a success with Verity . We held  a  “mini” Jen & Verity one to one antenatal group in my lounge which taught me things about not just what younger women want to know (perhaps women of all ages?) . I really don’t know if I could’ve written it in the same manner if I hadn’t made it especially for Verity . She calls me “Auntie Jen” so I wrote it not just as a midwife , but as her dear mum’s friend and as an “auntie”. 

Veritys baby is now over two years old and her birth was beautiful. I wasn’t there but my friend was ,they took the book in and read it . There were no complications and the birth was physiological . 

Last night I asked Verity if I could borrow the book back to look at it – I’d not seen it for over two years. Verity had kept it safe and sound – I was thrilled that she still had it . 

So here are a selection of pages from the book  – I am very proud of it but more proud of Verity and her beautiful daughter . It’s going straight back to Verity after I’ve published my blog.  (not her real name) 
Thank you for reading 
❤️Jenny ❤️

   
    
    
 

Babies, Birth, Courage, Kindness, Learning, Midwifery and birth, New parents, Newborn, NHS, Nursing, Patient care, Skin to skin contact, Women's rights

What Sparks Your Joy ?

I enjoy making my home feel like a warm welcoming place to my family and to friends as well as to myself  . A calm happy home gives me the ability to relax as well as work hard. However, I do own some clutter and although my home is clean I have spots that need organising . So this week I bought the book “Spark Joy” by Marie Kondo- it is about keeping items in our homes that make us feel joyous and getting rid of things that do not . Whilst reading it I was suddenly struck to consider what “sparks my joy” in midwifery? What should I cherish love and hold onto ? 

I would keep public speaking/social media , being an advocate for women , MatExp and being a mentor. I would also extol the virtues of being a “radical” Here’s why 

Public speaking and Social Media 

I really didn’t realise this until I spoke at Uclan to the future midwives and then at the Breatfeeding Festival in Manchester. Truthful feedback is imperative to me as it enables me to develop and see myself through others eyes. My focuses as a speaker are to impart knowledge , learn myself , inspire others to leave feeling they can make a difference and change the way they seen themselves perhaps to consider presenting themselves . I have to feel a positive sense of connection with the audience and I make a solid effort to achieve this as  it’s definitely important to me that presenting is a two way process . I ask questions and I learn from the audience . As well as talking about my passion for midwifery I also openly admit that I can’t know everything . I like to involve humor and also poetry – I feel so happy when others laugh and learn with me . The other reason I love attending conferences is that I network with other midwives and people who have a shared goal in making the NHS and especially maternity services even better . I see one of my key roles as tweeting at a conference to share the experience and agenda with the global midwifery network . I have made many real friends through twitter and I will continue to reiterate Eric Qualmans words “We don’t have a choice on whether we DO social media , the question is how well we DO it” I am privileged to have just written a section in an article with Teresa Chinn MBE about this topic . Teresa’s website HERE and she is the founder of We Communities which has changed the digital face of nursing midwifery medical and allied health professionals on line . Click HERE to find out more . I never in a million years realised that Twitter would connect me with such a community of compassionate and driven people . Social media is a vehicle that helps us to share information, learn and enable . This immeasurable crucial part of the infrastructure of global healthcare gave me the courage to become a blogging midwife and connect with the MatExp team but even more reinvigorated my passion to learn even more about midwifery the NHS , leadership , kindness  and start to cherish my own long hidden rebelliousness . Through THE SCHOOL FOR HEALTH AND CARE RADICALS I e found it’s ok to be radical and that change takes time and committment – if you want to learn more join the next cohort which starry this February – you will not look back (click HERE ) 

Being a mentor 

My other joy is being a mentor I love to ask future midwives how I can facilitate their learning and yet learn from them . I see myself as a radical mentor I talk about, teach and observe for compassionate care , courage and good communication. When working with students of any discipline  I feel it’s so important to hear their voice and also to be honest to them about obstacles they may encounter to prepare them for their future roles . I am a truthful mentor and it’s just so crucial that the first meeting is positive. My goal is to melt their fear or apprehension as soon as we meet  – to let them know that I am a teacher, a learner  and also that I am helping them on a journey . I do like to give spontaneous teaching sessions and find it hard to contain my excitement when future midwives tell me about  new research or publication. Mentoring also includes being a role model to peers , newly qualified midwives and reaching out to give others  help, inspiration and guidance face to face as well as through social media. I have several key mentors in my life and career who assist me through coaching and reflection which in turn aids my development as a mentor .  I love to hear news from colleagues and students as well as sharing with them new things I’ve read via social media , recommend blogs or books  to read and upcoming conferences . 

An advocate for women 

I will have been a midwife for 23 years this June. I see myself as constantly evolving and realise that I will never reach my destination – I don’t want to though I want to keep growing each day . By having this approach I  hope that I am open to women’s families and colleagues voices .I extol the long term and short term virtues and benefits of skin to skin contact at any opportunity .  Being a midwife means being a strong communicator and embracing oneself as an ambassador for global women . It’s about being current and modern despite age or experience – this ethos should apply to all who work in the NHS . Choice and consent should be embedded into our role as advocates . Cotinuity of carer must be a priority plus a positive communicative relationship  between the midwives  and  women all embedded into what we do just as much as a building needs a roof , windows , a door and warmth .  

MatExp 

Mat Exp is all about maternity experience . It’s a change platform where anyone can participate , discuss and suggest new ways to assess , plan, implement and receive care – putting the family first in Maternity services . MatExp is also about staff who are involved in this specialty and how we can improve their experiences too. This is why I adore it – everyone has an equal and valid voice – there is no hierarchy and ideas are constantly flowing . MatExp HQ exists in a virtual digital sense – it’s everywhere and a testament to the true power of social media . Due to MatExp I’ve learnt more about PostTraumatic Stress Disorder due to birth trauma which can affect men as well as women . I understand  more about the feelings of families when their babies have been stillborn or died after birth . I have been able to connect with women, families, health professionals and radicals to  spread the word about why collaboration works because we are actually doing it  . I have also met the most amazing people from all walks of life and feel I have connected with them in making a difference . Just search #MatExp on twitter or take a look at the website HERE to read about who is already involved and how you can get involved . 

So now you know what sparks joy in me- I’d like you to visualise Change as a form of  decluttering – it’s not necessarily forgetting about the old – but it’s making sure it’s archived so that we can look back as well as forwards and see why it’s so important to keep moving shifting and changing. Let’s make NHS care “Spark Joy” in the people that use it and the ones who work in it .

As a form of reflection think of four things that Spark Joy for you within your own work and life and write about them . 

Thank you for reading 

Jenny ❤️ 

Ps To my grown up children , my family and friends you also spark joy within me and you are and always will be in my heart – thank you ❤️

Being busy as a midwife, Birth, Courage, Discharge from hospital, Kindness, Learning, Midwifery and birth, Newborn, NHS, Patient care, Postnatal care, Skin to skin contact, Teaching, UK Blog Awards 2016, Women's rights

The UK Blog Awards 

I have entered this years UK Blog Awards in the Health Category to raise the public profile of midwifery in a positive light . 

Compassion is a crucial part of any midwife’s role and I find that blogging helps me to open the window of my midwifery soul through the written word.

It’s crucial that women and families have access to midwifery support now and in the future . Social media is a great way to connect to others and also to learn , inspire and lead. 

You can vote for me BY CLICKING HERE

Thank you for your ongoing support and for reading and sharing my blog . 

With love from Jenny 💛